The Reform Movement

As surfing happens, one thing leads to the next; investigating a quotation led me to a little book at Google.

Imperialism in America Its Rise and Progress By Sarah E. Van De Vort Emery 1892
Once I found the quotation I had searched for I needed to find the context of this little book. It is pretty clear that it is written from a socialist perspective. Mrs. Emery does a very nice job of sorting out the ‘political tricksters’. I think she fell just a bit off point by dividing the social order as capital vs. labor. The problem there is that labor is human capital. Nevertheless she points out the problems associated with ‘money’ manipulation in a very understandable way.

I find it interesting that problems we face today are the same problems of the country over 100 years ago. I am encouraged to know the battle for Liberty has been quietly continuing for such a long time. On the other hand we have been slowly losing ground to the Hamiltonian vision.

Some interesting pieces:

Today they know that Republicanism or Monarchy must go down. These conditions cannot remain co-existent when brought in daily contact with each other. The governments of the world must assume one form or the other, and to overthrow Republicanism in America is to give a new lease of life to the despotisms of the old world.

When the morning of the twentieth century dawns upon this country, it will either look upon a nation of slaves or a nation of freemen.

From time immemorial governments have been instituted, nations have risen, flourished, and then ignominiously passed away, and in every case we find the oppression of the masses has been the signal of dissolution. Republics die because the people become indifferent to the boon of liberty, and their children, unmindful of the fact that “eternal vigilance is the price of liberty,” let go their hold upon the principles which underlie self-government, and ere they are aware the boon of freedom is lost to them forever.

We find, then, that by controlling money, land, machinery and transportation it is an easy matter to control the labor of a people, and we find by taking advantage of these conditions a very few men are practically controlling this country with its 63,000,000 population.

The man who toils from year to year for the bare necessaries of life is a slave, whether it be on the cotton plantation of Mississippi or the cotton factory of Massachusetts, whether he be a black man or a white man, whether he be called a bondman or a freedman.

The first step is to gain control of the money; with power to inflate or contract it at pleasure. With this power all other sources of wealth are at the command of the money monger, who by producing a scarcity of his commodity is enabled to seize upon them at such prices as he may dictate.

There is no lever more powerful than prejudice, and nothing that fires the blood like the word “patriotism.” To the average man disloyalty to country embodies the entire category of crime, and to act in accordance with its best interests in his estimation is a virtue that atones for manifold sins.

There is no slavery so insidious as that of financial slavery, none which reduces the people to such depths of degradation and none to which they submit with such complacency; for their chains under the guise of freedom are unseen, and their clanking is drowned amid the boastful din of “our liberties.”

There is and always has been a class of men who seem to think the Almighty excepted them from the curse pronounced upon the human race, and that it is their special prerogative to eat their bread by the sweat of somebody else’s brow. Accordingly their chief study is to devise means by which they may obtain possession of what others have earned. Brave men accomplish this by means of physical prowess and valor, but cowards conceal themselves behind a barricade of law.

The money power is composed of the leaders of both of these parties, and however much they may feign to differ politically, their moneyed interests are identical.

The war of the rebellion wiped out chattel slavery, but out of its ashes has sprung a more gigantic system of wage slavery, founded on a system of monopolies and trusts – a mammon god – whose purpose is to consolidate the corporations, seize the powers of government and declare an empire.

Advertisements

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,

One Response to “The Reform Movement”

  1. Christa Says:

    Looks like an interesting book! It’s nice that it’s available on line.
    Yay Google!

    If you have more time for reading (I keep thinking somday I will!) check out the Molinari Institute’s History of Dissent – Online Library at
    http://praxeology.net/molinari.htm
    – includes Lysander Spooner, Benjamin R. Tucker, even our own Henry Bool!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: